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Therapist suggests making massage priority

Diane Metja is seen in her business, Touching Humanity, Wednesday, April 16.

Diane Metja is seen in her business, Touching Humanity, Wednesday, April 16. Photo By Peter Zuzga

April 16, 2014

Diane Mejta spent years explaining what she does for a living.

"It wasn't always popular like it is today, so you had to explain it. People thought it was a luxury," said Mejta, a massage therapist for 24 years.

Mejta knew right out of high school that she wanted to be a masseuse, although she briefly considered a career in nursing.

"I was more natural in thinking, more holistic," Mejta explained. "… Even as a little girl, I was really all about the natural approach to staying healthy. I believed if you take of your body, it takes care of you; if you help the body, then it takes care of itself naturally. It knows how."

Not that Mejta discounts traditional medicine, but she's seen massage help people with everything from headaches and knee pain to jaw problems and asthma, even attention deficit disorder.

Of course, most people come to her for the typical ailments: neck, shoulder and back pain.

"I think a lot of it has to do with computers," Mejta said. "Everyone is sitting for such a long time, and they don't take a break. They're trying to get their work done, but their posture might not be correct. And it can go into their neck and arms and legs, the lower back. It's all connected."

For Mejta, finding out how she can help is the best part of her work.

"It's like being a detective. I find the clues that the body is telling me through my hands and develop a plan to help them. And when people say, 'How did you find that?' or 'Oh, I feel so much better,' it's very rewarding."

Still, convincing people that massage can be part of an overall healthcare routine is a challenge.

"It's sad," Mejta said. "… Massage therapy should be part of everyone's health maintenance program. If you don't change the oil in your car, how well do you think it will work? Same concept. Your body and mind will perform to (their) full potential, if we take care of them."

And Mejta, who also works as an artist and belly dance teacher, practices what she preaches.

"I actually get massages every two weeks regularly. That's my time and my priority because my body is my machine. If I don't maintain it, I can't help anybody else."

Suggest a business for this spotlight by sending an email to news@cninow.com.

JUST THE FACTS

BUSINESS: Touching Humanity, 6922 W. North Ave.

ONLINE: TouchingHumanity.vpweb.com

PHONE: (414) 456-9600

OWNER: Diane Mejta

INCORPORATED: 1990

TYPE OF BUSINESS: massage therapy

PEARLS OF WISDOM: "It's like being a detective. I find the clues that the body is telling me through my hands and develop a plan to help them."

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